27 June 2022
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Viscount Survivors


59 of the 444 Viscounts built survive as complete airframes or major components. Some are in very good condition and are looked after by museums while others are just wrecks. They can be found in 24 countries.

Viscount history


Discover the history of the Viscount with film, video, contemporary reports from the pages of Flight Magazine, our newsletters, and aircraft operational records and photos from our database.


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Our 'Live Magazine' is used by members and non-members to share their Viscount photos and stories with fellow enthusiasts located throughout the world in real time.

You are able to send in your photos, stories and comments by Facebook, Twitter or email and we will post them for all to enjoy.

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Featured pages

Our website contains over 20,000 pages of photos and information that can all be accessed from the menu at the top of every page. Here are a few to get you started.



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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount

Help need to replace missing parts

Update by Denys Jones

The team at Ferrymead Heritage Park, New Zealand who are restoring Viscount c/n 283 ZK-BRF, need help replacing parts removed from the aircraft by NAC - New Zealand National Airways Corporation before restoration started in 1975. Missing are the elevator and rudder torque tube assemblies. They are elaborate units but fill a major space in the tail bay.

If you can help please contact Denys Jones - Denys.Jones@VickersViscount.net at the Ferrymead Heritage Park.

Quality of the restoration

The sequence of photos below illustrates the attention to detail that the team at Ferrymead Heritage Park are working to. The unit is one of two control cable tensioners that fits in the rear bay of the aircraft, one for rudder cables and one for elevators.

Often during restoration the team finds items that have changed colour during their operational lives. Where ever possible they are returned to the earliest and most original colour.

The control cable tensioner as inherited
The control cable tensioner as inherited.

The control cable tensioner is then stripped down to it constituent parts
The control cable tensioner is then stripped down to it constituent parts.

The parts are then cleaned by whatever method appropriate to the material they're made of
The parts are then cleaned by whatever method appropriate to the material they're made of.

The parts are then painted as appropriate - etch primed or galvanic primed, primed, and finally top coated
The parts are then painted as appropriate - etch primed or galvanic primed, primed, and finally top coated.

The control cable tensioner is then reassembled and finally fitted back into the aircraft
The control cable tensioner is then reassembled and finally fitted back into the aircraft.

For more information on this project visit the Ferrymead web site and watch the news pages here at the Vickers Viscount Network.

Ferrymead Heritage Park, Ferrymead Park Drive, Heathcote, Christchurch, New Zealand. Phone +64 3 3841970

Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

The Vickers Viscount Network is always interested to hear from anyone who has information or photographs to help complete the story of the Viscount. If you can help please contact us at
Information@VickersViscount.net.


Click here for more details about the Vickers Viscount Network

This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.