28 November 2021
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Viscount Survivors


59 of the 444 Viscounts built survive as complete airframes or major components. Some are in very good condition and are looked after by museums while others are just wrecks. They can be found in 24 countries.

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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 428

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 428
New Zealand National Airways Corp (NAC)


New Zealand flag New Zealand

This V.807A series Viscount was built for
New Zealand National Airways Corp (NAC) as ZK-BWO

It first flew on Wednesday, 10 May 1961 at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 510 engines.


Photo of Viscount c/n 428
Australian Aircraft Sales (NSW) Pty Ltd (AAS)


Australia flag Australia

Its final owner/operator was
Australian Aircraft Sales (NSW) Pty Ltd (AAS) as ZK-BWO.

Its fate:-
Stored at Seletar Airport, Singapore from 30 December 1975. Subsequently broken up for scrap circa 1981. The actual date is not known. Details please to information@vickersviscount.net


Operational record
Photo of New Zealand National Airways Corp (NAC) Viscount ZK-BWO

Country of Registration New Zealand

May 1961 to December 1975

New Zealand National Airways Corp (NAC)

ZK-BWO - c/n 428 - a V.807A series Viscount
New Zealand registered

10 November 1959
An order was announced by New Zealand National Airways Corporation (NAC) for their fourth Viscount and also for four Fokker F27 Friendships.

The total order value was approximately £2,000,000.

10 May 1961
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England fitted with Rolls-Royce Dart RDa6 Mark 510 engines.

12 May 1961
Handed over to New Zealand National Airways Corporation (NAC) named as 'City of Dunedin' at Wisley Airfield, Surrey, England.

The aircraft was accepted by Hon. T McDonald who was the New Zealand High Commissioner.

19 May 1961
Departed on delivery to New Zealand National Airways Corporation (NAC).

The cabin seating was configured for 60 passengers.

29 May 1961
Arrived at Rongotai Airport, Wellington, New Zealand after the long delivery from the UK.

15 and 16 February 1963
Used as the Number 2 aircraft for the visit to New Zealand of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh in support of ZK-BRE (C/N 282).

1963 Royal visit crew operating instructions


Slid down an embankment at Rongotai Airport, Wellington, New Zealand damaging No.3 and No.4 propellers.
Slid down an embankment
at Rongotai Airport, Wellington,
New Zealand

17 February 1963
After landing at Rongotai Airport, Wellington, New Zealand during a heavy rain storm the aircraft overran the runway and slid down an embankment onto Moa Point Road damaging the No.3 and No.4 propellers.

Some technical factors regarding this incident: -

On this particular day, the conditions at Wellington were unusual. There was heavy rain but the wind was light and variable. However, the crew was cleared for a landing to the South. The runway at Wellington has a marked slope from North to South.

The crew prepared for the landing during the descent from cruising altitude. They knew the exact weight of the aeroplane so the Target Threshold Speed (TTS) was calculated, allowing for any wind gusts or other factors. The TTS is the speed the pilot flying is aiming for at 50 feet above the runway threshold, at which point he will close the throttles, and aim to touch down at the 1,500ft markers on the runway. The flare is a matter of judgment based on the actual descent rate and the visually assessed height above the runway. If the flare is too early the aeroplane will start to float along the runway without touching down, and in the case of Wellington the slope of the runway simply makes matters worse, because there is also a factor called ground effect which is a cushion of air built up below the aircraft in calm conditions as pertained at this time.

It was up to the pilot in command to judge if a landing was possible, or alternatively to make a go-around. One complicating factor in this incident was that the First Officer was flying the aeroplane, and he failed to take corrective action when instructed to do so by the Captain, namely, to abort the landing.

It was recovered without further damage with a large crowd gathering to watch, as the incident occurred on a Sunday.

There were no injuries to the 37 passengers and 4 crew on board.

18 February 1963
Replacement propellers were flown from Christchurch inside a DC3 freighter with one blade of each propeller sticking out of a window position, which wasn't a problem as this type of aircraft was unpressurised.

20 February 1963
Ferried to Christchurch Airport, New Zealand for repairs.

Returned to service.

Painted in the NAC final Viscount livery.
NAC
final Viscount livery

circa 1968
Painted in the NAC final Viscount livery.

28 September 1975
Withdrawn from service and stored at Christchurch International Airport, New Zealand.

10 October 1975
NAC Technical Records show that the following Rolls-Royce Dart RDa6 Mark 510 engines were in-situ on the aircraft: -

No.1 position S/N 5283. No.2 position S/N 5270, No.3 position S/N 5326, No.4 position S/N 5383.

12 December 1975
Export Certificate of Airworthiness (CofA) issued.

17 December 1975
Sold to Australian Aircraft Sales (AAS).

FURTHER READING


The Illustrated history of New Zealand National Airways Corporation
by Richard Waugh, Peter Layne and Graeme McConnell

The Illustrated history of New Zealand National Airways Corporation 1947 - 1978


The delivery of New Zealand’s first Viscount by Peter Layne

The delivery of New Zealand’s first Viscount



Photo of Australian Aircraft Sales (NSW) Pty Ltd (AAS) Viscount ZK-BWO

Country of Registration New Zealand

December 1975 to December 1981

Australian Aircraft Sales (NSW) Pty Ltd (AAS)

ZK-BWO - c/n 428 - a V.807A series Viscount
New Zealand registered

17 December 1975
Purchased from New Zealand National Airways Corporation (NAC) and ferried to Kingsford Smith Airport, Mascot, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia via Norfolk Island.

30 December 1975
Ferried to Seletar Airport, Singapore and stored.

A proposed sale to Pearl Air was not completed

A proposed sale to Southern International in the UK as G-CSZC was also not completed.

A proposed sale to Air Caribbean was also not completed as C/N 282 was purchased instead.

22 January 1976
New Zealand registration cancelled.

21 November 1980
Noted still stored at Seletar Airport, Singapore.

circa 1981
Subsequently broken up for scrap.

The actual date is not known. Details please to information@vickersviscount.net


Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

The Vickers Viscount Network is always interested to hear from anyone who has information or photographs to help complete the story of the Viscount. If you can help please contact us at
Information@VickersViscount.net.


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This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.