09 December 2021
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Viscount Survivors


59 of the 444 Viscounts built survive as complete airframes or major components. Some are in very good condition and are looked after by museums while others are just wrecks. They can be found in 24 countries.

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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 399

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 399
Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP)


Brasil flag Brasil

This V.827 series Viscount was built for
Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP) as PP-SRE

It first flew on Thursday, 13 November 1958 at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 525 engines.


Photo of Viscount c/n 399
Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP)


Brasil flag Brasil

Its final owner/operator was
Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP) as PP-SRE.

Its fate:-
Crashed soon after taking off on a night training flight from Congonhas Airport, Sao Paulo, Brasil at 21:20 local time from runway 34 15 September 1968. The two crew and one person on the ground were killed.


Operational record
Photo of Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP) Viscount PP-SRE

Country of Registration Brasil

December 1958 to September 1968

Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP)

PP-SRE - c/n 399 - a V.827 series Viscount
Brasil registered

13 November 1958
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

3 December 1958
Delivered to Viação Aérea São Paulo SA (VASP) fitted with integral front 'airsteps'.

28 December 1962
During the approach to Santos Dumont Airport, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil on a service from Congonhas Airport, São Paulo the crew discovered that the starboard main undercarriage leg would not extend.

After circling the airport for an hour trying to get the leg to drop a wheels-up landing was made resulting in curled propellers and shockload damage to the Rolls-Royce Dart engines.

There were no reported injuries to the 32 passengers and 7 crew on board.

Repaired, including replacement Rotol propellers and Rolls-Royce Dart engines and returned to service.

8 January 1963
During the approach to an unknown location the crew discovered that the starboard main undercarriage leg would not extend.

A wheels-up landing was made resulting in curled propellers and shockload damage to the Rolls-Royce Dart engines.

This was caused by the failure of the up-lock push rod mechanism.

There were no reported injuries to the passengers and crew on board.

Repaired, including replacement Rotol propellers and Rolls-Royce Dart engines and returned to service.

15 September 1968
Crashed soon after taking off on a night training flight from Congonhas Airport, São Paulo, Brasil at 21:20 local time from runway 34.

It was intended that the No.1 engine would be feathered and the power reduced on the No.2 engine as the aircraft became airborne. The takeoff appeared o be normal with no radio messages from the crew.

Soon after takeoff Air Traffic Control requested a right turn to avoid conflict with an incoming Sud SE210 Caravelle which the crew acknowledged but nothing further was heard from them.

An eye witness on the ground said that the aircraft was flying lower than normal and turning to the left, rather than to the right as requested by Air Traffic Control. The aircraft crashed approximately 7,600 metres beyond the end of the runway.

It would appear that the Captain was trying to make a forced landing on a city street but the aircraft crashed into a house and exploded. The No.1 propeller was found to be in the process of being un-feathered when the aircraft crashed with the No.2 engine, still at a low power setting. The No.3 and No.4 engines were running at a high power setting.

A loss of asymmetric control is likely to have been the cause of the crash. This phenomenon has claimed the lives of several crews during training around the world.

Captain Neutel Serffert and his co-pilot were sadly killed as well as one person on the ground. Given the crash location the death toll could well have been much higher.

Total time 21,446 hours and 14,675 total landings.


Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

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Information@VickersViscount.net.


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This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.