28 November 2021
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Viscount Survivors


59 of the 444 Viscounts built survive as complete airframes or major components. Some are in very good condition and are looked after by museums while others are just wrecks. They can be found in 24 countries.

Viscount history


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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 336

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 336
Pakistan International Airlines (PIA)


Pakistan flag Pakistan

This V.815 series Viscount was built for
Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) as AP-AJD

It first flew on Tuesday, 27 January 1959 at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 525 engines.


During its life this aircraft was also owned and/or operated by
Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd


Photo of Viscount c/n 336
British Midland Airways (BMA)


England flag England

Its final owner/operator was
British Midland Airways (BMA) as G-AVJA.

Its fate:-
Crashed on takeoff from Ringway Airport, Manchester, England whilst on a positioning flight to Turnhouse Airport, Edinburgh, Scotland. 20 March 1969.

It was pre-planned that the flight would be used to carry out some training and that an engine failure would be simulated during takeoff. Shortly after takeoff the No.4 (starboard outer) engine was feathered and the aircraft yawed sharply to starboard, then leveled off and then entered a steeper climb whilst turning and rolling to starboard. The aircraft struck the ground inverted.


Operational record
Photo of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) Viscount AP-AJD

Country of Registration Pakistan

February 1959 to July 1964

Pakistan International Airlines (PIA)

AP-AJD - c/n 336 - a V.815 series Viscount
Pakistan registered

27 January 1959
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

13 February 1959
Delivered to Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) now fitted with extended range 'slipper' fuel tanks.

It was noted at London Airport (Heathrow), Middlesex, England on the same day.

The PIA titles were in Urdu script on the port side and Bengali script on the starboard side of the fuselage.

circa February 1959
Named as 'City of Lahore'.

3 July 1964
Sold to Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd.


Photo of Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd Viscount AP-AJD

Country of Registration Pakistan

July 1964 to July 1964

Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd

AP-AJD - c/n 336 - a V.815 series Viscount
Pakistan registered

3 July 1964
Purchased from Pakistan International Airlines (PIA).

3 July 1964
Leased back to Pakistan International Airlines (PIA).


Photo of Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) Viscount AP-AJD

Country of Registration Pakistan

July 1964 to June 1966

Pakistan International Airlines (PIA)

AP-AJD - c/n 336 - a V.815 series Viscount
Pakistan registered

3 July 1964
Leased from Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd in a later PIA 'green tail' livery still named as 'City of Lahore'.

15 June 1966
Returned to Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd.


Photo of Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd Viscount AP-AJD

Country of Registration Pakistan

June 1966 to March 1967

Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd

AP-AJD - c/n 336 - a V.815 series Viscount
Pakistan registered

15 June 1966
Returned from Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) lease to Prestwick Airport, Ayrshire, Scotland.

21 March 1967
Re-registered G-AVJA.


Photo of Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd Viscount G-AVJA

Country of Registration United Kingdom

March 1967 to June 1967

Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd

G-AVJA - c/n 336 - a V.815 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

21 March 1967
Re-registered from AP-AJD.

A sale to Luxair was not completed.

2 June 1967
Sold to British Midland Airways (BMA).


Photo of British Midland Airways (BMA) Viscount G-AVJA

Country of Registration United Kingdom

June 1967 to March 1969

British Midland Airways (BMA)

G-AVJA - c/n 336 - a V.815 series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

2 June 1967
Purchased from Hawker Siddeley Aviation Ltd and ferried from Prestwick Airport, Ayrshire, Scotland to East Midlands Airport, Castle Donington, Leicestershire, England.

8 September 1967
Noted at Gatwick Airport, Surrey, England due to a Luton Airport weather diversion. The passengers were transferred to Luton by coach.

Crashed on takeoff from Ringway Airport, Manchester, England.
Crashed at Ringway,
Manchester, England

20 March 1969
Crashed on takeoff from Ringway Airport, Manchester, England whilst on a positioning flight to Turnhouse Airport, Edinburgh, Scotland.

It was pre-planned that the flight would be used to carry out some training and that an engine failure would be simulated during takeoff. Shortly after takeoff the No.4 (starboard outer) engine was feathered and the aircraft yawed sharply to starboard, then levelled off and then entered a steeper climb whilst turning and rolling to starboard. The aircraft struck the ground inverted.

There were four crew on board, Captain I D Wallace, First Officer R A Weeks and Stewardesses S Wallis and Jane Timson. Sadly only Jane survived the crash.

An 'eye witness' account by Lance Shippey: -

Thursday was a fine weather afternoon and l had just been informed that l had been accepted to work for BEA at Manchester flying the BAC Super One-Eleven. I was walking with mail to the terminal building's post office. Crossing the apron beyond the B.O.A.C. cargo office and the parking area for visiting light aircraft l heard the whine of the Rolls-Royce Dart engines from a Viscount. Continuing my journey on foot, l watched BMA G-AVJA taxi to the threshold of Runway 06.

The aircraft lined up and started to roll, becoming airborne fairly quickly as it passed the south side hangar, climbing out opposite the control tower. At around 500-650 feet, the aircraft yawed to the right, and went into a vertical bank, before inverting, and hitting the ground nose first.

After the whine of the Darts stopped, there was a deadly silence, and a few seconds after the impact, a "woosh" as the fuel ignited around the wreckage. An ambulance arrived fairly quickly, along with the fire service, who dowsed the flames with foam.

l spoke to a friend working as station engineer for BMA, an hour or so after the crash. He said that he had rushed to the site, and saw a stewardess standing dazed near the tail section. This would be the sole survivor. The aircraft was on a positioning flight from Manchester to Edinburgh and the sole occupants were two flight deck crew, and two stewardesses. Jane Timson had survived, but the others were sadly killed.

The contents of a Hansard notice referring to the accident discussed between Mr Alfred Morris [by private notice] and the Minister of State Board of Trade, Mr William Rodgers, stated that the crash happened at 16.58 B.S.T. and that the aircraft yawed at 50 ft. As l witnessed the crash, my calculation was the aircraft had reached 500 to 650 feet before the yaw. The accident was captured on roll film. The photographer was an aviation enthusiast, photographing the aircraft from l believe, the parking area near to the Fairey Engineering hangar.

The take off was also being used as a training exercise. with experienced Captain Wallace in command, who was also the BMA safety officer cutting power to one of the Rolls-Royce Dart engines on the starboard wing.


Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

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Information@VickersViscount.net.


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This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.