21 March 2019
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Viscount history


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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 234

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 234
Capital Airlines (USA)


United States flag United States

This V.745D series Viscount was built for
Capital Airlines (USA) as N7472

It first flew on Friday, 5 July 1957 at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 510 engines.


Photo of Viscount c/n 234
Northeast Airlines Inc


United States flag United States

Its final owner/operator was
Northeast Airlines Inc as N6592C.

Its fate:-
Damaged beyond economic repair after National Airlines Douglas DC6B N8228H operating flight 429 collided with it at Logan Airport, Boston, Massachusetts, USA shearing off the tail section and the outer section of the port wing 15 November 1961.

The Viscount had just landed on runway 04R when it was hit by the departing DC6B on intersecting runway 09. The Captain of the DC6B thought that he had been given takeoff clearance.

There were no serious injuries to the 8 crew and 37 passengers on board the Viscount or the 30 passengers and crew on the Douglas DC6B.

Remains broken up for scrap after spares recovery.


Operational record
Photo of Capital Airlines (USA) Viscount N7472

Country of Registration United States

July 1957 to July 1958

Capital Airlines (USA)

N7472 - c/n 234 - a V.745D series Viscount
United States registered

circa March 1957
The purchase by Capital Airlines with fleet number '390' was not completed.

5 June 1957
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England in a bare metal condition with the US registration applied.

July 1958
Converted to Type V.798D for sale to Northeast Airlines Inc and re-registered N6592C.


Photo of Northeast Airlines Inc Viscount N6592C

Country of Registration United States

July 1958 to November 1961

Northeast Airlines Inc

N6592C - c/n 234 - a V.745D series Viscount
United States registered

July 1958
Converted to Type V.798D for sale to Northeast Airlines Inc and re-registered from N7472.

29 July 1958
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England after conversion.

21 August 1958
Departed on delivery fitted with the integral front 'airsteps' and weather radar ordered by Capital Airlines.

It was seen at Prestwick Airport, Ayrshire, Scotland on the same day before heading for Iceland, Greenland and Canada and then down into the USA.

David Carter illustration of  Northeast Airlines Viscount N6592C

Viscount illustrations by David Carter


15 November 1961
Damaged beyond economic repair after National Airlines Douglas DC6B N8228H operating flight 429 collided with it at Logan Airport, Boston, Massachusetts, USA shearing off the tail section and the outer section of the port wing. The Viscount had just landed on runway 04R when it was hit by the departing DC6B on intersecting runway 09. The Captain of the DC6B thought that he had been given takeoff clearance.

There were no serious injuries to the 8 crew and 37 passengers on board the Viscount or the 30 passengers and crew on the Douglas DC6B.

PROBABLE CAUSE: The Investigation Board considered that the ground collision accident occurred as the result of the commencement of takeoff by National Airlines flight 429 without clearance. Contributing factors were the failure of the control tower personnel to provide adequate surveillance of the active runways and the failure to issue an appropriate warning to the pilot of the DC6B alerting him to the impending traffic conflict.

Total time 8,328 hours and 7,529 total landings.

Remains broken up for scrap after spares recovery.


Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

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This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.