26 June 2022
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Viscount Survivors


59 of the 444 Viscounts built survive as complete airframes or major components. Some are in very good condition and are looked after by museums while others are just wrecks. They can be found in 24 countries.

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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 102

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 102
Central African Airways Corporation (CAA)


Rhodesia flag Rhodesia

This V.748D series Viscount was built for
Central African Airways Corporation (CAA) as VP-YNE

It first flew on Saturday, 7 July 1956 at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 510 engines.


Photo of Viscount c/n 102
Central African Airways Corporation (CAA)


Rhodesia flag Rhodesia

Its final owner/operator was
Central African Airways Corporation (CAA) as VP-YNE.

Its fate:-
Crashed east of Benghazi, Libya whilst on approach to Benina International Airport, Libya when it struck high ground 9 August 1958.

It was operating the Central African Airways (CAA) Zambezi Coach service from Salisbury International Airport, Kentucky, Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland to London Airport (Heathrow), Middlesex, England.

Of the 54 people on board, 4 of the 7 crew and 32 of the 47 passengers were sadly killed.


Operational record
Photo of Central African Airways Corporation (CAA) Viscount VP-YNE

Country of Registration Rhodesia

July 1956 to August 1958

Central African Airways Corporation (CAA)

VP-YNE - c/n 102 - a V.748D series Viscount
Rhodesia registered

August 1954
An order was placed by Central African Airways Corporation (CAA) for five V.748 Viscounts powered by Rolls-Royce Dart RDa6 Mark 510 engines and a 47 seat high-density cabin.

They were fitted with de Havilland propellers which was the first application to a production Viscount.

Production Aircraft No. 131 - the 131st production V.700 series Viscount built,
was the 89th Viscount fuselage assembled at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England,
and the 91st Viscount assembled at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

Production Order No. F05/748. Sales Order No. F05/67B. Stock Order No. F50/27B.

29 February 1956
Fuselage assembly commenced at Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

14 April 1956
Fuselage to Erecting Shop 'E' at Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

7 July 1956
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire England.

The aircraft accumulated 14 hours and 5 minutes flying time during the test flight phase.

18 July 1956
Delivered to Central African Airways Corporation (CAA) at London Airport (Heathrow), Middlesex, England named as 'R M A Mpika'.

It was delivered fitted with extended range 'slipper' fuel tanks which were later removed.

18 August 1956
The undercarriage collapsed during a landing at London Airport (Heathrow), Middlesex, England which necessitated several engine and prop changes.

Total time 161:55 hours.

circa January 1957
The federal flag of Rhodesia and Nyasaland was applied to the tail. This was the first of the fleet to have it applied.

6 February 1957
Total time 1,027:25 hours.

8 May 1957
Total time 1,616:46 hours.

6 July 1957
Took the Queen Mother from Salisbury International Airport, Kentucky, Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland to Kumalo Airport, Bulawayo, Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland as part of a Royal Tour of Rhodesia and Nyasaland fitted out in a VIP configuration. Kumalo Airport (locally spelt Khumalo) which was built during WW II was not normally suitable for a Viscount but with a light load this was made possible for this special occasion. She had previously arrived from London 2 July 1957 on board BOAC Bristol Britannia Series 102 G-ANBN.

circa late 1957
Weather radar installed by Marshall's at Teversham Airport, Cambridge, England.

12 February 1958
Total time 3,009:48 hours.

6 June 1958
Total time 3,679:47 hours.

9 August 1958
Crashed east of Benghazi, Libya whilst on approach to Benina International Airport, near Benghazi, Libya when it struck high ground.

Operating the CAA Zambezi Coach service from Salisbury International Airport, Kentucky, Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasalans to London Airport (later known as Heathrow), Middlesex, England the aircraft departed Salisbury at 07:13, 8 August 1958. En-route stops were made at Ndola - Northern Rhodesia, Entebbe - Uganda, Khartoum and Wadi Halfa - Sudan. After refuelling at Wadi Halfa the flight departed for Benina - Libya at 21:20.

Four hours later at 01:12 the crew were cleared into the Benina Control Zone. At 01:14 permission for a direct approach to runway 33R was requested and granted.

At 01:15 the aircraft struck high ground 5.5 miles SE of the runway.

Of the 54 people on board, Captain Cyril L Sindall, First Officer Ian J Gow and Radio Officer E C Hoar of the 7 crew and 32 of the 47 passengers were sadly killed.

PROBABLE CAUSE: When making the approach to runway 33R, while flying in cloud the pilot descended below the safe height for the area possibly due to a mis-set or mis-read altimeter. There was also a possibility that the crews efficiency had been reduced by fatigue.

British servicemen stationed in Benghazi with the Royal Sussex Regiment 1st Battallion including Private Brian Harman were called out to recover the bodies and to clear away the wreckage.

Total time 4,101 hours and 2,733 total landings.


Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

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This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.