11 December 2018
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Established 2005
Vickers Viscount Network
A Virtual Museum dedicated to the Vickers-Armstrongs VC2 Viscount
   

Viscount c/n 63

Operational Record

Photo of Viscount c/n 63
British European Airways Corporation (BEA)


England flag England

This V.701C series Viscount was built for
British European Airways Corporation (BEA) as G-ANHC

It first flew on Wednesday, 1 December 1954 at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England powered by Rolls-Royce Dart 506 engines.


Photo of Viscount c/n 63
British European Airways Corporation (BEA)


England flag England

Its final owner/operator was
British European Airways Corporation (BEA) as G-ANHC.

Its fate:-
Crashed after a mid-air collision with Italian Air Force Canadair built F-86E Sabre fighter MM19830 at 23,500 feet above Nettuno, near Anzio, Italy, during flight BE142 from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Luqa Airport, Malta via Naples Airport, Italy 22 October 1958.

The accident was attributed to 'an Act of God', since neither of the pilots saw the other aircraft before they collided.

A contributory cause of the accident was the deviation of the Viscount from the airway which placed it in a prohibited area reserved for military activities.


Operational record
Photo of Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd Viscount G-ANHC

Country of Registration United Kingdom

December 1953 to October 1954

Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd

G-ANHC - c/n 63 - a V.701C series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

August 1949
Discussions concluded between Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd and British European Airways Corporation (BEA) regarding the specification for the V.701 aircraft.

Accommodation for 47 passengers at a gross weight of 53,000 lbs was specified.

3 August 1950
Order placed by British European Airways Corporation (BEA) for 20 V.701 aircraft which was later increased to 26.

This was the 23rd V.701 Viscount ordered by British European Airways Corporation (BEA).

12 December 1953
Registered to Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd.

Production Aircraft No. 44 - the 44th production V.700 series Viscount built,
was the 15th Viscount fuselage assembled at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England,
and the 19th Viscount assembled at Hurn, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

Production Order No. F03/701C. Sales Order No. 03/87A. Stock Order No. 12/22B.

11 June 1954
Fuselage assembly commenced at Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

9 August 1954
Fuselage to Erecting Shop 'E' at Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

22 October 1954
Registration to Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd cancelled.

25 October 1954
Registered to British European Airways Corporation (BEA).


Photo of British European Airways Corporation (BEA) Viscount G-ANHC

Country of Registration United Kingdom

October 1954 to October 1958

British European Airways Corporation (BEA)

G-ANHC - c/n 63 - a V.701C series Viscount
United Kingdom registered

25 October 1954
Registered to British European Airways Corporation (BEA).

1 December 1954
First flight from Hurn Airport, Bournemouth, Hampshire, England.

19 December 1954
Certificate of Airworthiness issued.

19 December 1954
Delivered to British European Airways (BEA) named as 'R M A Sir Leopold McLintock'.

It was fitted with Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 506 engines and designated as a V.701C.

1954 to 1958
The original Rotol design propeller blades were gradually replaced by new symmetrical ‘paddle’ blade propeller sets.

From photographic evidence, both propeller types were fitted to Rolls-Royce Dart RDa3 Mark 505 engines and many V.701 aircraft flew with an ‘intermix’ of both types of propeller blades.

23 April 1956
This aircraft was used to carry Soviet premier Nikita Krushchev and Marshal Bulganin from London Airport (later known as Heathrow), Middlesex, England to Elmdon Airport, Birmingham, West Midlands, England and then on to RAF Marham, Norfolk, England.

26 April 1956
This aircraft was used to carry Soviet premier Nikita Krushchev and Marshal Bulganin from London Airport (later known as Heathrow), Middlesex, England to Turnhouse Airport, Edinburgh, Scotland.

18 June 1956
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Princess Margaret and the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester all flew from Bromma Airport, Stockholm, Sweden to London Airport (later known as Heathrow), Middlesex, England at the conclusion of the Royal visit to Sweden.

This was the first Viscount to carry HM Queen Elizabeth II.

22 October 1958
Crashed after a mid-air collision with Italian Air Force Canadair built F-86E Sabre fighter MM19830 at 23,500 feet above Nettuno, a small fishing village near Anzio, Italy, during flight BE142 from Heathrow Airport, London, England to Luqa Airport, Malta via Naples Airport, Italy. All 26 passengers and 5 crew died in the accident. The fighter pilot from Practica di Mare airbase, Captain Giovanni Savorelli survived after ejecting. Three other F-86Es in the same formation landed safely.

The accident was attributed to an 'Act of God', since neither of the pilots saw the other aircraft before they collided. A contributory cause of the accident was the deviation of the Viscount from the airway which placed it in a prohibited area reserved for military activities.

11 November 1958
Registration cancelled as aircraft destroyed.

Total time 9,110 hours and 4,555 total landings.

On 21 April 2006 the memorial stone was unveilled.
On 21 April 2006 the memorial stone was unveilled

21 April 2006
A memorial stone was unveilled near the crash site.

The stone is in the shape of a Viscount tail and has the aircraft registration G-ANHC on it, and on the base is a list of the names of all those on board.

The memorial was designed by Terry Bannon whose Father, Radio Officer James Bannon was on board this ill-fated flight. Terry also negotiated with the local authorities to gain permission to erect this memorial and they were very helpful and sympathetic.

Access to the memorial is often restricted as it lies within a military base used for testing weapons.

Relatives, friends and local officials gathered at the memorial stone to pay their respects.
50th Anniversary

25 October 2008
Relatives, friends and local officials gathered at the memorial stone to pay their respects to those lost in this tragic accident.

Special 50th Anniversary plaques made by Terry Bannon were presented to the local officials by Terry's wife Nuala.

FURTHER READING: Books about BEA - British European Airways



Photo of BEA - British European Airways Viscount G-AOJC

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This website has been designed, built and is maintained by Geoff Blampied, Norwich, Norfolk, England.